Wild in the Pryors

A Blog about the Pryor Mountain Wild Horses

Posts tagged ‘Mustangs’

2014 Pryor Foal, # 2.

My friend Shawn Ivy just discovered the second foal in the Pryors born this year.   It is Greta and Garcia’s.  No word on a name or what sex it is yet.  Thank you Shawn for letting us all know!

Sandy

Greta with her new foal.  Photo by Shawn Ivie (Wyoman Photography)

Greta with her new foal. Photo by Shawn Ivie (Wyoman Photography)

Greta is the 2006 daughter of Belle Starr and Chino.  Garcia is the 2006 son of Topper and Tony.

Greta, August, 2013

Greta, August, 2013

Garcia, August, 2013

Garcia, August, 2013

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

First Foal Born on the Mountain, 2014.

According to the Pryor Mountain Wild Mustang Center and TCF, Ginger has discovered the first known foal to be born on the mountain for 2014.  I had a feeling Waif would be one of the first to foal this year based on how large Norte was when I found him the end of April last year.

Photo by NPS. April 8, 2014

Waif and her new colt.  Photo by NPS. April 8, 2014

Waif and Corona had a colt.  Ginger has named him Orion.

Waif, born in 1997 is the daughter of Twiggy and Cortez.  Corona, born in 1997 is the son of Sorita and Sam.

Waif and Norte, April 2013

Waif and Norte, April 2013

Corona, July 2013

Corona, July 2013

2015 Camping Tour Dates

View from my campsite, July 14, 2013 at 8:55 pm

View from my campsite, July 14, 2013 at 8:55 pm

Below are the available Tour Dates for 2015.   For questions and reservations:  Phone: 406-244-0015.  Cell: 406-360-8959.  Email: wildinthepryors@aol.com

Please click here to read some reviews from past guests: REVIEWS

August sunset.

August sunset.

Wild in the Pryors is permitted by the Bureau of Land Management to conduct small group tours within the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range from January to December. Wild in the Pryors is one of a handful of businesses that have the federal permits necessary to guide clients onto this federal property.
Wild In The Pryors is also licensed to give tours within the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area.

Sandy lives in Montana and goes to the Pryors many times through-out the year (in the calendar year of 2013 she spent more than 60 days with the horses). Experience a camping trip with someone who knows all the horses and the places they may hide.  With this trip, you won’t just go to view the horses, you will go to know the horses, hearing the many stories that she shares, making this a once in a life-time experience.

If you have a group of 4 and want a private camping tour, contact Sandy for other possible dates.

All tours may include light to moderate hiking.

All trips include transportation up and down the mountain, all food, snacks, tents, and expert personal guiding. (last night dinner is on your own once we return to Lovell).

Camping trips will be limited to 4 guests.  Sandy will have an assistant with her who will do the camp cooking and help you with any camping needs.  Sandy will personally be doing all of the guiding.

Cost:

Four Day Camping Trips: $1040.00 per person

Three Day Camping Trips:  $780.00 per person

Mystic Pond in June, 2013

Mystic Pond in June, 2013

Camping Dates for 2015:

June

This trip may be a bit colder than the others, but to be some of the first people to see the horses reach the mountain top for the summer, makes it all worth it.

1. June 17-20, 4 day/ 3 night

July:

This month is the most popular and also the prime wildflower season.

1. July 2-5, 4 day/3 night Full Moon

2. July 7-9, 3 day/2 night

3.  July 11-14, 4 day/3 night

4.  July 26-28, 3 day/4 night

5.  July 30- August 2, 4 day/3 night.  A “Once in a Blue Moon” trip.  The 2nd Full Moon of July.

August:

This trip may include more hiking, it just depends on the year.  However, if you love to hike and see some of the hidden areas that not many people get to see, this would be a great month for you.  The sunsets are even more intense this time of year.

August: 28-31, 4 day/3 night Full Moon

Lakota, July 2011.

Lakota, July 2011.

All trips leave from Lovell, Wyoming (unless other arrangements are made).  Airports nearby: Billings, Montana.  Cody, Wyoming.

A 50% down payment is required upon booking with the remainder due one month prior to your trip.

All payments are considered non-refundable. Refunds may be made when cancellations can be filled.

 Anyone interested in a trip will be asked to complete a Pre-Screening Health Questionnaire, and those who book a trip will be required to sign an Acknowledgement of Responsiblity and Assumption of Risk document, as per Montana State Law.

Tecumseh and Blue Moon, June 2013.

Tecumseh and Blue Moon, June 2013.

Be sure if you book a trip with someone, that they have the proper permits in place. This is required by law for anyone giving tours on Public Lands.  Please click on PERMITS to read my blog post about this.

 

Sandy

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

 

 

Mountain Update from the NPS

I received this message from Cass Bromley from the NPS with a brief update and some photos.  Thank you so much Cass, I really appreciate the update!

Hernando with Phoenix and Warbonnet, February, 2014

Hernando with Phoenix and Warbonnet, February, 2014

Hi Sandy,
From Thursday went up Sykes and Burnt Timber, lots of horses mostly out in the “hell n gone”, or Area Q or whatever you call that area way out there from Burnt Timber…. There are a few spots starting to show just a little green. We saw Bristol’s band, Grijala’a band, Hidalgo’s, Corona’s, Garay’s, Duke’s (still missing Madonna), Jackson’s (still has Heritage), Baja’s and Galaxy’s. We also saw Jemez, and Tecumseh still dogging his old band. No new foals yet.
Cass

All photos credit to NPS.

Jackson band, February, 2014

Jackson band, February, 2014

UPDATE: To clarify a few things in this report, I emailed Cass, based on some of the questions I got from you.

1.  All members are still in Jackson’s band.

2.  I am 99.9% sure that they saw Hernando with Phoenix and Warbonnet, not Grijala.  Those two can be pretty hard to identify, especially at a distances (which this was).  The NPS focus right now is the mares (for the PZP treatments), so I can imagine that it would be easy to just look over the stallions.

Sandy

Washakie and Nahwa

Washakie and Nahwa

 

Noble

Noble

Tecumseh still dogging Gringos.

Tecumseh still dogging Gringos.

Duke

Duke

Part of Dukes

Part of Dukes

Map of Range taken from the internet.

Map of Range taken from the internet.

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

First Pryor Foal Born in Europe.

Bella and Onida

Bella and Onida

I got an email from my friend Cedric yesterday, announcing the birth of the first Pryor foal born this year (born yesterday!).  This colt is also the first Pryor foal to be born in Europe.  He has named him Onida.

Cedric agreed to give me some more information to share and I will let him tell his story.  Thank you so much Cedric for sharing!

Sandy

Targa and Bella

Targa and Bella

I bought my first horses 9 years ago. Two colts. I had a small pasture or a large paddock and as long as I was not born with horses, I started to learn as much as possible about how horses living in the wild. And I found Ginger’s movie, on DVD.

This was my first encounter with the Pryor Mustangs. I got in contact with BLM to adopt one, but unfortunately, it’s not possible for non US resident. I’ve check some Pryor’s breeder websites and I met (by email) Bess Carnahan. I asked her about wild horses behavior when they were rounded up and how to gentle them. That was in 2005.

In 2007, I saw on Bess’s website a wild stallion for sale. It was Targa. He was born in 2002, from Starbuck (Starbuck is the sire of Capucino) and a mare called Mae West. Targa, who was called Chai by the BLM, was removed in 2006. He was proposed to internet adoption but the BLM had a problem with their website. He was on page 2 and this page has not been published. So nobody adopted him and the BLM finally asked Bess if she would buy him. She already had stallions but accepted. After one year, when she finally got the papers form the BLM, she put him for sale. And she has accepted to sell him to me.

Targa

Targa

But I had a kind of feeling of guilty. Targa was not born to spend his live in a bachelor band and to carry an human. He was born to live free and to have progeny. Bess Carnahan was ready to sell me Pryor mares born in captivity but the pasture / paddock I had was not suitable for a breeding program.

Targa's_training

I’ve convince my wife to move and in the end of 2010, we bought an old farm, 30 miles away from our house and still 20 miles away form Geneva / Switzerland. While we were restoring the farm, I’ve agree with Bess to buy Media Noche, a black mare born in 2003 in captivity by El Cid, a born wild stallion by King and an unknown mare and by La Sombra, a daughter of the famous Shaman. With my family, we moved to the farm in July 2011 and Media Noche arrived in October 2011.

Unfortunately, Media Noche died 24 hours after she arrived. She probably didn’t support the stress of the travel. I was desperate and guilty to have make this poor mare endure such a long trip to die here. All my projects were stopped. I had to take some time for reflection. It came obvious that I had to go and see the wild Pryor horses. In August 2012, I’ve travel alone to the US to see them and to meet Bess for real.

Media Noche

Media Noche

I was on the range during the 2012 round up. I was thinking to buy a mare at the auction but once again, it was very complicated because the BLM don’t allow foreigners to adopt horses. But once again, Bess was there and accepted to sell me a daughter of Media Noche : Bella. She is a daughter of Chico, a stallion bought by Bess to the Hartman.

Bella spent 6 months at Steve Smith facility in Nebraska. He worked and gentle her enough to let her be able to endure the quarantine and the flight toward Europe.

Bella arrived at my place in March 2013 and after a few days to rest, she’s been introduced to Targa. They became a nice pair, very in love together.

Bella_(2)

Finally, one year after Bella and Targa’s meeting came Onida. It’s an O year for foals in the Pryors Mountains and I choose this name because it means in Iroquoian language “long awaited for”.

Onida, March 23, 2014

Onida, March 23, 2014

Bella and Onida

Bella and Onida

Like Hope Ryden, I can say, “Thank your, Pryor Mountain wild horses. You changed my life!”.

And the story is not finished! I’ll be back on the range next Summer with all my family and you, Sandy. I’m sure we will enjoy those coming days.

Cedric

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Camping Trips, Day Trips and Permits

Burnt Timber road, February, 2013

Burnt Timber road, February, 2013

As the camping and day tour season approaches, I thought I would just touch base on a few things that perhaps many people are not aware of.

If you have someone other than yourself take you up on the mountain (camping or day trip) and they are charging you a fee to do it, they need to have a special permit from the BLM and/or NPS.  Wild in the Pryors (Sandy) has both of these.  It took me several hours to fill out the application.  It is very detailed and requires you to also have the proper amount of insurance in place as well.

Please ask those people if they have the proper permits in place before sending them a deposit or booking a trip.  If you are in doubt if they do and want to check yourself, you can call the Billings BLM office and they can connect you with someone who can check for you.  Their phone number is: 406-896-5013.  It is against the law, NOT to have a permit and to charge for services.

It is frustrating for myself and other permit holders to learn of other people who are advertising and conducting tours without these proper permits in place.   Not only is it frustrating for all of us, but it also causes more people on the mountain, more people around the horses, who many times don’t respect them like they should.

I run a very small tour (no more than 4 guests) on my camping tours.  I plan on leaving it that way so that my presence will affect the horses (and the land) as little as possible.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact myself or the BLM.

Sandy

Grijala and Kohl, July 2011.

Grijala and Kohl, July 2011.

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

February In The Pryors. Day 4. Peaceful

Burnt Timber area, 2-18-14

Burnt Timber area, 2-18-14

What is it about the Pryor Horses, or any wild horses for that matter?  They each give us a gift that if you take the time to listen and except it, it will change your life.  Forever.  Some people just want to go and see them, others want to feel their presence.  To me that is what it is all about.  Feel the horses and the land, it has much to offer.

On this trip I was given two very special people to share the horses with.  Ones that want to take the time to experience all that the horses have to offer.   People that don’t mind sitting for hours (in the snow!!) just watching and enjoying every little move or interaction.  Thank you Anh and Kimerlee for being there with me and sharing in my passion.

Firestorm, 2-18-14

Firestorm, 2-18-14

The morning of February 18 was clear and sunny.  The temperature was 25 as we left Lovell and headed towards Burnt Timber Road.  The expected high was to be 38 in Lovell.  A perfect day.  We were all looking forward to seeing more horses.

Along the way, we spotted another Bald Eagle perched in a tree.

American Bald Eagle

American Bald Eagle

We parked, unloaded Ophelia and loaded her back up with all of our camera equipment, lunches, water, shovels, emergency supplies and were headed up the frozen road by 9.  I was happy for the firm mud on the lower part of the road.   I also want to note and give thanks to Ginger for her tracks that she made in the snowy road just a few days before I got there.   For the most part they were still there, packed down, making our journey a bit easier.

I stopped where we had spotted Cappuccino and band and Jasper and Grijala the evening before.  Hiking over the hill, I only saw the two bachelors, still in the same area.  We decided to continue on.  My goal was to again get as far as the mine and park there where I would have a great view of the range.

We made it there with little trouble.  I do think that long red hill is a bit scary any time of the year (because of its narrowness), but in the winter, it can be a tad more-so.

I spent some time looking through my binoculars (wishing I had a scope!).  After a short time I suggested we leave Ophelia parked ( I knew the next part of the road was going to most likely be more difficult with very little room to turn around).  I love hiking and had a feeling that we may see Jackson and his band from where I had spotted them the afternoon before.

The hiking was pretty easy.  The road was packed down and we only sunk to our knees in the snow a couple of times.

Just a short way up the road, I caught a glimpse of some horses.  It was Phoenix, Warbonnet and Hernando.  Where was Half Moon and Missoula?  I thought perhaps they were ahead and I just missed seeing them.  Hernando had a very obvious limp.

Phoenix and Warbonnet, 2-18-14

Phoenix and Warbonnet, 2-18-14

Hernando

Hernando

I was hoping to see them again, once I got to the top of that hill.  Instead, I saw this:

Jacksons Band

Jacksons Band

While I was happy to see Jackson (always!!), I was also disappointed not to be able to get a closer look at Hernando and his new band.  I could see Jackson watching up the draw, so I assumed that Hernando was most likely down that way too.  I also heard a horse calling for others (Teton?)  and also the noise of a stallion trying to breed a mare.

Jackson watching something up the draw.

Jackson watching something up the draw.

We stopped in our tracks and let Jackson and his beautiful band get used to our presence before moving on.  I am especially careful in the winter months about my movements.  I do not want to be the cause of a horse expanding anymore energy than they normally would.  Patience is a great virtue to have with wild horses, especially in the winter.

Jacksons band lined up eating snow.

Jacksons band lined up eating snow.

Brumby and Galena

Brumby and Galena

Jackson and Maelstrom

Jackson and Maelstrom

Wide-anle look towards them.

Wide-anlge look towards them.

Heritage

Heritage

Heritage and Firestorm

Heritage and Firestorm

Moorcroft

Moorcroft

Moorcroft

Moorcroft

Once I saw them carrying on normally (grooming, grazing, not always focused on us), then and only then did we move pass them and away to a good place to “camp out”.

I was surprised and happy to see the bare ground and the amount of forage available to them in this area.  These horses don’t have open water from the guzzlers in this area.  The guzzlers are frozen in the winter months, so unless it is a warm day with some puddles, the snow is their only water source.  Amazing creatures, so strong with their will to survive.

I chose a big rock to sit and watch these amazing horses.  I love when they carry on as if we are not there.  It truly is a gift that they give us to see and I soaked up every minute of it.

Firestorm, wide-angle

Firestorm, wide-angle

Firestorm, Telephoto lens.

Firestorm, Telephoto lens.

I quickly spotted Hernando just below the hill from Jackson’s band.  He seemed nervous.  It was not the best place for him to be.  He kept looking up the hill every time a horse got closer to him.  But he could not see who it was, which added to his nervousness.  I still could not see Half Moon or Missoula and I found myself starting to worry about them.  I knew there was no way I could walk past Jackson and closer to them without disturbing them too much, so I stayed parked and waited.

Jackson Band.  Can you see Phoenix in this shot?

Jackson Band. Can you see Phoenix in this shot?

2-18-14

2-18-14

Hernando, Phoenix and Warbonnet

Hernando, Phoenix and Warbonnet

Phoenix, 2-18-14

Phoenix, 2-18-14

Jackson band

Jackson band

Brumby and Moorcoft were enjoying the slushy snow, which lead to some mutual grooming and then Moorcroft spent several minutes nursing.  That made me decide that Brumby was just round (as always) and not pregnant.  But of course I could be wrong.  We will just have to wait and see.

Brumby and Moorcroft

Brumby and Moorcroft

Brumby and Moorcroft

Brumby and Moorcroft

2-18-14

2-18-14

Brumby and Moorcroft

Brumby and Moorcroft

2-18-14

2-18-14

Brumby and Moorcroft

Brumby and Moorcroft

Firestorm

Firestorm

Maelstrom

Maelstrom

Nye and Malestrom

Nye and Malestrom

Nye and Maelstrom

Nye and Maelstrom

Niobrara

Niobrara

Firestorm

Firestorm

Wide-angle shot of the surrounding beauty.

Wide-angle shot of the surrounding beauty.

Looking the other direction.

Looking the other direction.

Hernando was getting even more nervous, as Heritage worked her way towards the hill directly above them.  Jackson sensed a change and went over to move his band back and check out the situation.

Hernando

Hernando

Wild in the Pryors

A very uneasy Hernando

A very uneasy Hernando

Hernando

Hernando

Wild in the Pryors

Wild in the Pryors

2-18-14 I love the look on Nye and Niobrara faces.

Hernando heads towards Jackson

Hernando heads towards Jackson

Hernando quickly retreats.

Hernando quickly retreats.

Jackson moves his band away from the ridge.

Jackson moves his band away from the ridge.

I could no longer see Hernando, Phoenix and Warbonnet and assumed they had worked their way further down.  Jackson stayed alert, but started to relax a bit more, appearing to nap in the warm sun, watching over Firestorm and Niobrara.

Jackson, Niobrara and Firestorm, 2-18-14

Jackson, Niobrara and Firestorm, 2-18-14

Moving over to watch Hernando

Moving over to watch Hernando

Jackson and Heritage watching Hernando.

Jackson and Heritage watching Hernando.

The band took Jackson que and began to move on over the ridge.

Niobrara and Firestorm

Niobrara and Firestorm

Firestorm

Firestorm

Firestorm

Firestorm

We waited until they were out of sight over the ridge before we decided to go up and see if we could see anything.  I snapped this photo of where Firestorm had been lying and where she had rolled.  I was surprised to see the imprint of the ribs and realized that she was still on the thin side this year, but better than the last.

Firestorm's snow imprint.

Firestorm’s snow imprint.

The horses were moving down the ridge.  I was a bit cautious on where we should go to look.  I knew that there was an avalanche warning in Western Montana on anything with more than a 30 degree slope.  Even though there was bare ground here, there was still plenty of deep snow around.  Those type of conditions could easily set off an avalanche.  Ice on top of snow with more snow on top of the ice.  Very unsettled layers.   I did not want to risk it.

We made our way a few feet down the road where I could just make out a place on the ridge that was bare.  I started to hike to it and got stuck, about 6 feet from the ridge.  With cameras and backpack, there was not way I could even attempt to “swim” up the rest of the way.  I turned around and snapped this photo of Kimerlee coming down.  I really thought it gave a good perspective.  You can see my tracks where I came down too.

2-18-14

2-18-14

We continued down the road looking for another place to the ridge.  I was concerned on the location of Jackson and did not want to risk disturbing them.  So we found a comfortable spot and sat and watched the location of everyone.  We could see the occasional head poke up on the ridge.

I still had not seen Half Moon and Missoula.  After several hours, I was beginning to think that they were not with Phoenix and Warbonnet.

Warbonnet and Phoenix

Warbonnet and Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Wide-angle of view of where we were now.

Wide-angle of view of where we were now.

Another wide-angle.

Another wide-angle.

At one point we watched Jackson run towards Hernando.  There was a very brief encounter between the two of them, then it was quiet.

While we sat there, we mapped out a possible way to get through the deep snow to the ridge.  We waited until we could not longer see Jackson.  It appeared they were moving back to the area where they were before.  We took this opportunity to slowly make our way up to the ridge.

As we approached the ridge, this is what I saw:  Heritage.  I have a soft spot for this beautiful mare.  She is the mother of my adopted Pryor, Kootenai.  I am so hoping that her plump shape means she is pregnant.  Heritage does not have any offspring on the range now.  A Heritage (daughter of Warbonnet and Lakota) would be a wonderful thing, not to mention that it would also be a Jackson offspring.

Heritage

Heritage

Heritage

Heritage

Heritage.  Her profile looks so much like Kootenais.

Heritage. Her profile looks so much like Kootenais.

Heritage and Jackson.

Heritage and Jackson.

The band did not seem to mind us being there.  We settled in the deep snow and watched them on the patch of bare ground,  enjoying their interaction with each other and soaking up their amazing presence.  It truly was a gift to be here and I treasured every second of it.

Jackson puts his ears back at Heritage

Jackson puts his ears back at Heritage

2-18-14

2-18-14

Jackson and Heritage

Jackson and Heritage

Jackson and Heritage

Jackson and Heritage

The young colt Maelstrom had grown into such a handsome boy.  Other than his color, he is beginning to look so much like Jackson.  He seems to be equally as confident as his father and will someday make an amazing band stallion.

Maelstrom and Jackson

Maelstrom and Jackson

2-18-14

2-18-14

Father and Son

Father and Son

Maelstrom and Jackson

Maelstrom and Jackson

2-18-14

2-18-14

Jackson

Jackson

Maelstrom

Maelstrom

Then they moved slightly up the ridge and gave us a blue sky background that seemed fake.   We all looked at each other in disbelief.  Was this really happening?

Kimerlee and I have birthdays soon, so we looked at each other and said ” Happy Birthday to us”!  I certainly do not need any more than what was given to me this day.

Jackson

Jackson

Jackson

Jackson

Jackson

Jackson

Jackson

Jackson

Maelstrom

Maelstrom

Maelstrom

Maelstrom

We watched the band slowly work their way off the ridge and to the other side of the road.  We took the opportunity to walk down the ridge a bit, but still did not see Hernando.

Kimerlee feeling the magic of the Pryors!

Kimerlee feeling the magic of the Pryors!

Kimerlee with Jacksons band in the background

Kimerlee with Jacksons band in the background

Anh making her way through the deep snow.

Anh making her way through the deep snow.

Jacksons Band

Jacksons Band

Jacksons band

Jacksons band

I left Kimerlee and Anh and hiked up a near-by hill to have a look around and snap some wide-angle shots.

2-18-14

2-18-14

High on Burnt Timber

High on Burnt Timber

I looked through my binoculars and  spotted some horses!  It was Doc and his band and with them were Half Moon and Missoula!!  I was relieved to see them and glad they were okay.

Demure looks to be pregnant.  I don’t think Half Moon is, but I hope I am wrong, if she is, it could very well be Teton’s last offspring.

Docs with Half Moon and Missoula

Docs with Half Moon and Missoula

Docs with Half Moon and Missoula

Docs with Half Moon and Missoula

Docs

Docs

Docs

Docs

Docs, 2-18-14

Docs, 2-18-14

Changes…my heart ached for Teton and hoped he was still okay.  It is the cycle of life for a band stallion to loss his band when he ages, but it did not make my heart ache any less.  I am happy for Hernando.  He is an amazing stallion.  Time will tell if he can hold on to what he now has.  The mountain changes by the day, and I wondered how things would shake out by spring.

I turned my focus back to Jackson’s band and watched them peacefully grazing.  What an amazing day we were having.

Jackson band

Jackson band

Anh and Kimerlee

Anh and Kimerlee

The day was turning late.  We needed to hike back to Ophelia and start to head down the mountain.  As we reached Ophelia, Anh spotted a lone horse way up on a hill.  I looked through the binoculars to get a better look.  It was Teton.  Could the rest of his band see him from where they were?  I think they could.  I certainly know from where Teton was he could most likely see them.

Wild in the Pryors

This day was filled with joy, sadness and peace.  We continued down the mountain, not seeing another horse, but feeling very full-filled.  We reached the bottom of the range, just as the sun was about to set.

2-18-14

2-18-14

Bighorn Mountains lit by the sunset.

Bighorn Mountains lit by the sunset.

Kimerlee Curyl is an amazing photographer and also a beautiful person inside and out.  I was happy to be able to share with her the Pryor Horses for the first time and look forward to many more meetings with her.  Anh has become a best friend and I was excited that she could join me on this trip.  Words can not express how great my time with these two amazing women were.

You can find out more about Kimerlee and see some of her gorgeous work by going to her website.  Click on Kimerlee to go there.

Sandy

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

February In The Pryors, Day 1 and 2.

IMG_5316-1

A Bald Eagle put on a great display for us, just before we entered the range. February 16, 2014.

It had been too long since I had made my way to the Pryors.  October was my last trip and I felt that I could get out and run faster than my truck could carry me this time.  At times that may have been true, the road was not good over Homestake Pass, near Butte, Montana.   I was happy to get down the other side, where it was clear sailing the rest of the way.

Anh and Kimerlee would be joining me on this trip and we were all eager to see fuzzy horses in the snow.  The week before we arrived had been cold and snowing, but the forecast looked pretty good for the days we would be here.  A high of 40 seemed warm after experiencing -25 just a few short weeks ago.

Arriving in Lovell later than I liked yesterday, I immediately drove us to the Dryhead.  This time of year can be pretty problematic for seeing horses there, but I wanted to check anyway and knew we did not have time to unload and head up either Burnt Timber or Lower Sykes.

We immediately saw a horse on a hill as we entered.  Through binoculars, we determined it was Kememerer.  We made a group decision to continue on and see who else may be out.  We made our way slowly down the paved road, rewarded once more with the sighting of the handsome stallion Fiero, alone.  I have decided he enjoys being this way in the winter.  Perhaps he doesn’t want the extra burden of a band during the more trying months of the year.

Fiero, February 15, 2014

Fiero, February 15, 2014

I really love Fiero, he is the full brother to my Valerosa whom I adopted in 2009.  I would really love to see some Fiero offspring on the range.  He just needs to stay keep some mares long enough for that to happen!

IMG_5308-1-1 IMG_5291-1-1 IMG_5289-1-1

Fiero, February 15, 2014

Fiero, February 15, 2014

The next morning by 8, we were heading up Burnt Timber Road.  Since my last trip, I purchased a wide-angle lens and I was really looking forward to taking some photos of the landscape again.  It is almost like taking the mountain home with me.  I hope these photos can give you a sense of what this beautiful mountain holds.

One of the many views up Burnt Timber Road.  February 16, 2014

One of the many views up Burnt Timber Road. February 16, 2014

We were immediately rewarded as soon as we entered the range.  Grijala and Jasper passed right near us.  I had seen these two bachelors in October, and they still looked as healthy and fat as they had looked then.  I was happy to see this, especially for this time of year.

Jasper

Jasper

Grijala, Febuary 16, 2014

Grijala, Febuary 16, 2014

Jasper, February 16, 2014

Jasper, February 16, 2014

Grijala

Grijala

Jasper

Jasper

I wish we could have had more time with these boys, but the seemed to be on a mission, and kept moving.  So we did too.

Burnt Timber road did not have as much snow as I experienced last February, at least not this day.  I easily went past the spot where I had gotten stuck last year.   We were in my UTV, Ophelia (it is an O year after all) and she was making her way up the mountain easily.  We could see some horses ahead!  It was Jackson and his band, and as I turned and looked right, I could see Galaxy and his band.  Everyone was enjoying the warm sunlight hitting their thick fur, a welcome treat after the previous week.

Jackson

Jackson

Jackson, February, 2014

Jackson, February, 2014

Jackson seemed to be showing some wounds that had recently healed.  Jasmine was still absent from his band, and I wondered if maybe Jackson had received these wounds during that exchange.

Healing wounds on his side.

Healing wounds on his side.

Wounds on this face

Wounds on this face

I was pleased to see both Galena and Firestorm looking healthier and much fatter than last year at this time.  They both appear to be pregnant to me.  Brumby also looked round, but sometimes Brumby just looks that way.  Time will tell.

Galena

Galena

Galena

Galena

Jackson and Galena

Jackson and Galena

Heritage

Heritage

Brumby

Brumby

Brumby

Brumby

Brumby

Brumby

Brumby.  Photo by Anh.

Brumby. Photo by Anh.

Niobrara, Firestorm and Maelstorm

Niobrara, Firestorm and Maelstorm

IMG_5416-1

I especially noticed how much Moorcroft and Malestrom had grown.  Both Malestrom and Moorcroft are entering their second year.  I wondered if Jackson would kick them out this year, like he had done when Jasper turned 2.

Moorcroft

Moorcroft

Moorcroft

Moorcroft

Moorcroft

Moorcroft

Nye

Nye

IMG_6104-1

IMG_6157-1

IMG_6149-1

I watched Galaxy and his band rise from their naps slowly make their way over the ridge.  Galaxy is such a great band stallion and his mares seem very content.  Everyone look great.  I am not sure if we will see any new foals in this band this year.

Galaxy and band, February 16, 2014

Galaxy and band, February 16, 2014

Galaxy's

Galaxy’s

Galaxy

Galaxy

View looking down towards Turkey Flats.  I love the hoof prints in the foreground.

View looking down towards Turkey Flats. I love the hoof prints in the foreground.

The snow on the road was becoming the consistency of thick mash potatoes.  As Ophelia struggled to go further, we quickly realized that this warm day would not let us.  Looking towards  the sky, we could see some dark clouds coming in from all sides.  We decided to head down the road.  The melting snow and the slippery red dirt under it made for an interesting and exciting ride back down the mountain.

Threatening Clouds forming all around us.

Threatening Clouds forming all around us.

IMG_6176-1

Just as we went exited the horse range, the snow and rain fell on us.  We decided to drive to Lower Sykes and have alook.  The rain was still falling there and a creek had formed down the middle of the road.

IMG_6179-1

Looking up the road to Lower Sykes.

IMG_6180-1

We would have end our day and head back towards Lovell.  This time of year, I am always grateful to see any horses and today we saw several.  Tomorrow will be another day on the mountain, and I can’t wait for it to get here!

Sandy

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

What Color Will The Foals Be? 2014

Sunset with the horses, July 2011

Sunset with the horses, July 2011

Faithful blog follower, most comments made on this blog, and friend, Sarah Griffin asked if she could do a post on the possible colors of the foals this year.  I said yes, so this post was written by Sarah.  Thanks Sarah.

If you have not read my post about who may have foals this year, it may be helpful to read that first.  Click on FOALS to go to that post!

Sandy

Nirvana, July 2013

Nirvana, July 2013

What Color Will The Foals Be?

I thought it would be fun to look at potential colors we may see in the foals born this year. I thought I would go over some of the basics of the genes used in these color predictions. The first is the base color which can be either black or red. “E” is the gene that represents black and it is dominant. A horse with an E gene will have a black base and may either be black or a color with black “points” (the black legs, mane, etc) such as bay, grullo, and dun. To have a chestnut base and display the chestnut color the horse must have two “e” (recessive) genes. These are the chestnut horses along with the palominos. A horse that is EE (homozygous black) will only produce offspring with a black base. Since each parent can only give one representation of the gene one parent may give an “E” and the other parent may give an “e” resulting in an offspring that is Ee. Ee is called a “red carrier.” While that horse will display a black base color they have the potential to produce offspring with a chestnut base. An example of this is the late black stallion Raven. His father was a sorrel stallion which resulting in Raven being Ee. Although he displayed the black color he carried the chestnut gene from his father, which enabled Raven to sire palomino and red roan offspring. The next gene is the roan gene represented by “R” being the dominant roan gene and “r” being the recessive non-roan gene. A horse that is RR is homozygous roan and will only produce roan offspring. A horse that is Rr displays the roan gene but also carries the non-roan gene meaning they can produce both roan and non-roan offspring. A horse that is rr does not have the ability to pass on anything but the non-roan gene to their offspring.  They only way they could produce a roan offspring would be when that offspring inherits the roan gene from their other parent. The dun gene works the same way as the roan gene with DD being homozygous, Dd being heterozygous (displays the dun gene, but also carries the non- dun gene) and dd not possessing the dun gene.

Moorcroft, Maelstrom, Galena and Nye, April 29, 2013

Moorcroft, Maelstrom, Galena and Nye, April 29, 2013

With my knowledge of the horses and their lineage I think I was pretty much able to figure out their different representations of these genes. Of course with them being wild horses they haven’t been gene tested so it’s hard to be 100% certain about all of them. If I wasn’t certain I left the dun and/or roan gene (depending on which/if any apply for a certain case) as heterozygous. And if I wasn’t sure on the E vs e I left it as unknown meaning the calculator took into account the different possibilities (EE, Ee, with ee applying to only chestnuts and palominos). When figuring out these genes it’s easiest to look at a horse’s parents and the offspring that the horse has produced. For example we know Blue Moon is heterozygous roan because his father was a solid dun and his mother was a blue roan. We also know that both Teton and Half Moon are red carriers because they produced a chestnut offspring. And also going back to the example of Raven, we know he has to be a red carrier because his father was chestnut meaning the only gene he could have passed to his son was “e”. And looking at the offspring that Raven produced also lets us know he must be Ee.
The calculator also doesn’t separate shades of a color. For example seal bay, light bay, dark bay, “average” bay, red bay all fall under the category of “bay.” The calculator also doesn’t have the color apricot dun, so in the horses that may carry that color gene it falls into the category of “red dun.”  It also doesn’t account for shading so coyote dun (ex: Jackson) falls into the category of “dun.”
And of course we can’t 100% predict or know what color the foal will be, but I think it’s fun to look at the different color possibilities that could turn up!  If we’ve seen one of these mare/stallion combos before I also added the colors we’ve already seen them produce.

Bristol, Kitalpha and Nova, September 2013

Bristol, Kitalpha and Nova, September 2013

Bristol x Kitalpha


75% Grullo

25% Red Dun

**Bristol and Kitalpha have produced a red dun foal**

Hidalgo, July 30, 2012

Hidalgo, July 30, 2012

Jewel

Jewel

Hidalgo x Jewel/ Icara (bay)

I think Jewel is actually a dark bay, but it’s hard to tell and even harder to tell with Icara so I ran Icara as both a bay and a black.

32.81% Dun
32.

81% Bay

12.50% Red Dun

12.50% Chestnut

4.69% Grullo

4.69% Black

Icara

Icara

Hidalgo x Icara(black)


18.75% Grullo

18.75% Black

18.75% Dun

18.75% Bay

12.50% Red Dun

12.50% Chestnut

Halo

Halo

Hidalgo x Halo


32.81% Dun

32.81% Bay

12.50% Red Dun

12.50% Chestnut

4.69% Grullo

4.69% Black

Fresia, May 18, 2012

Fresia, May 18, 2012

Hidalgo x Fresia


I wasn’t sure if Hidalgo and Fresia were homozygous for the dun gene or not, but since they’re full siblings they would likely both be the same so I calculated it both ways, but either way the most likely color is red dun.
(heterozygous dun)

37.50% Red Dun

18.75% Grullo

18.75% Dun

12.50% Chestnut

6.25% Black

6.25% Bay (homozygous dun)

50% Red Dun

25% Grullo

25% Dun

Fools Crow

Fools Crow

Fools Crow x Jewel/ Icara (bay)

32.81% Bay Roan

32.81% Bay

10.94% Blue Roan

10.945 Black

6.25% Chestnut Roan

6.25% Chestnut

Fools Crow x Icara (black)

43.75% Blue Roan

43.75% Black

6.25% Chestnut Roan

6.25% Chestnut

Fools Crow x Halo

32.81% Bay Roan

32.81% Bay

10.94% Blue Roan

10.945 Black

6.25% Chestnut Roan

6.25% Chestnut

Fools Crow x Fresia
(Fresia- heterozygous dun)


18.75% Grullo Roan

18.75% Grullo

18.75% Blue Roan

18.75% Black

6.25% Red Dun Roan

6.25% Red Dun

6.25% Chestnut roan

6.25% Chestnut
(Fresia- homozygous dun)

37.50% Grullo Roan

37.50% Grullo

12.50% Red Dun Roan

12.50% Red Dun

Corona

Corona

Waif

Waif

Corona x Waif


93.75% Bay

6.25% Black

**Corona and Waif have produced several bay foals and a black foal**

Blue Moon

Blue Moon

Halcyon, July 2012

Halcyon, July 2012

Blue Moon x Halcyon

25% Grullo Roan

25% Blue Roan

25% Bay Roan

25% Dun Roan
Since Sitka and Shaman had so many foals, it’s most likely that they didn’t carry the “red gene” or we would have seen it show up somewhere along the line, so that would mean that Blue Moon isn’t a carrier either, which would prevent him from siring a red roan foal with Halcyon. But since we don’t have a DNA test to be totally sure, I decided to also do a calculation with him as a carrier. That results in it being 50% likely they would have a red roan foal (either red dun roan or chestnut roan), but we haven’t seen that yet. **So far Blue Moon and Halcyon have produced two nearly identical grullo roan foals.**

Isadora, September 2010

Isadora, September 2010

Blue Moon x Isadora


25% Grullo Roan

25% Grullo

25% Blue Roan

25% Black

Cappuccino, 2-17-13

Cappuccino, 2-17-13

Gabrielle

Gabrielle

Cappuccino x Gabrielle

93.75% Dun

6.25% Grullo

**Cappuccino and Gabrielle have produced several dun foals**

Custer, August 2012

Custer, August 2012

Leo and Fiasco, June 2012

Leo and Fiasco, June 2012

Custer x Fiasco


18.75% Bay Roan

18.75% Dun Roan

18.75 Dun

18.75 Bay

6.25% Grullo Roan

6.25% Grullo

6.25% Blue Roan

6.25% Black

**Custer and Fiasco have produced dun roan and grullo roan foals**

Coronado

Coronado

Fools Gold

Fools Gold

Coronado x Fools Gold


43.75% Dun Roan

43.75% Dun

6.25% Grullo Roan

6.25% Grullo

**Coronado and Fools Gold have produced a dun roan foal**

Dove and her filly, August 30, 2012

Dove and her filly, August 30, 2012

Coronado x Dove


16.41% Buckskin Roan

16.41% Buckskin

16.41% Bay Roan

16.41% Bay

6.25% Palomino Roan

6.25% Palomino

6.25% Chestnut Roan

6.25% Chestnut

2.34% Smokey Blue Roan

2.34% Smokey Black

2.34% Blue Roan

2.34% Black

**Coronado and Dove have produced a sooty buckskin roan foal**

Doc

Doc

Demure, July 2011

Demure, July 2011

Doc x Demure

37.50% Dun

37.50% Bay

12.50% Grullo

12.50% black

**Doc and Demure have produced a grulla foal**

Duke, July 7, 2012

Duke, July 7, 2012

Graciana

Graciana

Duke x Graciana


32.81% Dun

32.81% Bay

10.94% Grullo

10.94% Black

6.25% Red Dun

6.25% Chestnut

**Duke and Graciana have produced a dun foal**

Helenium

Helenium

Duke x Helenium


35.16% Dun

35.16% Bay

12.50% Red Dun

12.50% Chestnut

2.34% Grullo

2.34% Black

Galaxy

Galaxy

Hera

Hera

Galaxy x Hera

43.75% Blue Roan

43.75% Black

6.25% Chestnut Roan

6.25% Chestnut

Garcia

Garcia

Greta

Greta

Garcia x Greta


32.81% Dun

32.81% Bay

10.94% Grullo

10.94% Black

6.25% Red Dun

6.25% Chestnut

**Garcia and Greta have produced dun and dark bay/ black foals**

Gringo during the removals, July 2012

Gringo during the removals, July 2012

Jacinta

Jacinta

Gringo x Jacinta

70.31% Bay

25% Chestnut

4.69% Black

Galadrial

Galadrial

Gringo x Galadrial


82.03% Bay

12.50% Chestnut

4.57% Black

Tecumseh was seen breeding Galadrial in mid-September, so I also did a calculation with him.

Tecumseh, July 31, 2012

Tecumseh, July 31, 2012

Tecumseh x Galadrial


32.81% Bay Roan

32.81% Bay

12.50% Chestnut Roan

12.50% Chestnut

4.69% Blue Roan

4.69% Black

Horizon, July 7, 2012

Horizon, July 7, 2012

Juniper

Juniper

Horizon x Juniper

17.58% Dunskin

17.58% Buckskin

17.58% Dun

17.58% Bay

6.25% Red Dun

6.25% Palomino

6.25% Dunalino

6.25% Chestnut

1.17% Smoky Grullo

1.17% Smoky Black

1.17% Grullo

1.17% Black

Jackson, February, 2013

Jackson, February, 2013

Firstorm

Firstorm

Jackson x Firestorm


32.81% Bay Roan

32.81% Dun Roan

12.50% Red Dun Roan

12.50% Chestnut Roan

4.69% Grullo Roan

4.69% Blue Roan

**Jackson and Firestorm have produced several bay roan foals and a blue roan foal

Galena, February 2013

Galena, February 2013

Jackson x Galena

32.81% Dun

32.81% Bay

10.94% Grullo

10.94% Black

6.25% Red Dun

6.25% Chestnut

**Jackson and Galena have produced seal bay, grullo, and dun foals**

Hertiage

Heritage

Jackson x Heritage


16.41% Bay Roan

16.41% Dun Roan

16.41% Dun

16.41% Bay

6.25% Red Dun Roan

6.25% Chestnut Roan

6.25% Red Dun

6.25% Chestnut

2.34% Grullo Roan

2.34% Grullo

2.34% Blue Roan

2.34% Black

Jasmine

Jasmine

Jackson x Jasmine


16.41% Bay Roan

16.41% Dun Roan

16.41% Dun

16.41% Bay

5.47% Grullo Roan

5.47% Grullo

5.47% Blue Roan

5.47% Black

3.13% Red Dun Roan

3.13% Red Dun

3.13% Chestnut Roan

3.13% Chestnut

Morning Star, June, 2012

Morning Star, June, 2012

Hailstorm

Hailstorm

Morning Star x Hailstorm

16.41% Buckskin Roan

16.41% Buckskin

16.41% Bay Roan

16.41% Bay

5.47% Smoky Blue Roan

5.47% Smoky Black

5.47% Blue Roan

5.47% Black

3.13% Palomino Roan

3.13% Palomino

3.13% Chestnut Roan

3.13% Chestnut

Gaelic Princess

Gaelic Princess

Morning Star x Gaelic Princess

32.81% Dun

32.81% Bay

10.94% Grullo

10.94% Black

6.25% Red Dun

6.25% Chestnut

**Morning Star and Gaelic Princess have produced a black foal**

Hataalii

Hataalii

Morning Star x Hataalii


43.95% Dun

43.95% Bay

3.13% Red Dun

3.13% Chestnut

2.93% Grullo

2.93% Black

**Morning Star and Hataalii have produced a bay foal**

Irial

Irial

Audubon

Audubon

Irial picked up Audubon when she left Morning Star to go foal. When Ginger first saw them together the foal was already a couple weeks old (found May 8th) and Irial held onto Audubon and her filly for several more weeks before losing them back to Morning Star. While Irial had them he kept his little band well hidden so there’s a chance that Audubon got pregnant before she was able to be darted with pzp. If so, then Irial would be the father. She was mostly likely pzp darted once she was back with Morning Star and more visible, but if she foals later in the summer (probably unlikely) then Morning Star would be the father.

Irial x Audubon

32.81% Grullo Roan

32.81% Blue Roan

10.94% Grullo

10.94% Black

4.69% Red Dun Roan

4.69% Chestnut Roan

1.56% Red Dun

1.56% Chestnut

Morning Star x Audubon


17.58% Bay Roan

17.58% Dun Roan

17.58% Dun

17.58% Bay

5.86% Grullo Roan

5.86% Grullo

5.86% Blue Roan

5.86% Black

1.56% Red Dun Roan

1.56% Red Dun

1.56% Chestnut Roan

1.56% Chestnut

**Morning Star and Audubon have produced blue roan and dun roan foals**

Teton 2

Teton

Half Moon:trees

Half Moon

Teton x Half Moon

28.13% Bay Roan

28.13%  Bay

12.50% Chestnut Roan

12.50% Chestnut

9.38% Blue Roan

9.38% Black

**Teton and Half Moon have produced a flaxen chestnut foal**

Cloud, October, 2011

Cloud, October, 2011

Feldspar, May 20, 2012

Feldspar, May 20, 2012

Cloud x Feldspar

6.25% Dunalino Roan

6.25% Dunalino

6.25% Chestnut

6.25% Chestnut Roan

6.25% Palomino

6.25% Palomino Roan

6.25% Red Dun Roan

6.25% Red Dun

3.13% Smoky Blue Roan

3.13% Dun

3.13% Dun Roan

3.13% Bay Roan

3.13% Black

3.13% Blue Roan

3.13% Buckskin

3.13% Dunskin

3.13% Smoky Grullo

3.13% Bay

3.13% Smoky Black

3.13% Smoky Grullo Roan

3.13% Dunskin Roan

3.13% Grullo

3.13% Grullo Roan

3.13% Buckskin Roan

**Cloud and Feldspar have produced blue roan and palomino foals**

Innocentes, April, 2012

Innocentes, April, 2012

Cloud x Inocentes

6.25% Dunalino Roan

6.25% Chestnut

6.25% Chestnut Roan

6.25% Dunalino

6.25% Palomino

6.25% Palomino Roan

6.25% Red Dun Roan

6.25% Red Dun

5.47% Buckskin Roan

5.47% Dun

5.47% Dun Roan

5.47%Dunskin Roan

5.47% Bay Roan

5.47% Bay

5.47% Dunskin

5.47% Buckskin

0.78% Black

0.78% Blue Roan

0.78% Smoky Blue Roan

0.78% Smoky Black

0.78% Smoky Grullo Roan

0.78% Grullo
0.78% Grullo Roan

0.78% Smoky Grullo

Sunset in the Pryors, August 30, 2012

Sunset in the Pryors, August 30, 2012

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Adoption Update, 11 years later, Seneca’s Son.

Seneca's Son, 2003

Seneca’s Son, 2003

I had someone contact me about the Pryor Horse she adopted in 2003.  She had the horses number, so I was able to look it up and realized it was most likely Seneca’s first foal, born in 2002, # 2206.

Seneca was born in 1999 to the mare Guinevere and band stallion Starbuck.  She remained with that band until (according to the information I have) 2001, where she then went to be with the band stallion Sam. Giving birth to this colt in the spring of 2002.  So Sam is most likely the father of this boy.

Seneca, September 3, 2012

Seneca, September 3, 2012

Sam, August 2005. Photo by Ross K.

Sam, August 2005. Photo by Ross K.

In 2003 the Pryors were offered for adoption via an internet adoption.

Paper from Ross K.  Thanks Ross!

Paper from Ross K. Thanks Ross!

I am a little unclear on the exact details, but I believe that Seneca’s colt was adopted via the internet auction, but the adopter was not able to accept him.  From there, he was then sent to a BLM facility in Lorton, VA. where Sandra adopted him.

Rebel, as he is now called, lives in Mississippi with one other Mustang (from Oregon) and four miniature horses.  He is very curious, willing and fast!

Below are a few photos that Sandra sent to me.  Some of these photos are when Sandra and her family adopted him.

0716891-R1-005-1 2 0716891-R1-007-2 0716891-R1-009-3 0716891-R1-013-5 0716891-R1-015-6 0716891-R1-019-8 0716891-R1-021-9 0716893-R1-049-23 0716893-R1-051-24 get-tmpimg-1.aspx get-tmpimg-2.aspx get-tmpimg.aspx

Rebel, 2012

Rebel, 2012

 

Thank you Sandra for contacting me and sharing.  It is always great to see and hear how the Pryors are doing after they were adopted.

Also thank you Ross for the extra information and photos!

Sandy

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

Logo designed by Amber Bushnell

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